Norah GMom's auntlr

Norah

Betty gmom's cousin

Norah’s daughter, Betty

Looking at old photos reminds me of Norah’s story that my grandmother told me. Norah was also affected by World War One and her story is a sad one where you see the ripple effects of the war down the generations.

My grandmother’s aunt was Norah Ellery and she is the eldest child in the photo on the previous post. Norah ran away to America after World War One and left a letter saying that by the time it was being read, she would be on a ship to America. She met her husband-to-be on the ship – was it a ship romance? They married and had a daughter called Betty and Norah worked as a housekeeper or a cook in America. Eight years later, Norah returned to England to visit with Betty who was seven years old. Norah caught a cold and pneumonia most likely on the ship and died ten days after arriving in England in 1926 and was buried in Bridport aged 37. My grandmother was a little girl of about 3 or 4 and remembered her aunt being unwell and asking her for a glass of water.

The problem was what to do with Betty, a girl of seven in a ‘foreign’ country. These days the obvious solution would have been to send her back to her father in America. However a policeman said although he couldn’t advise them what to do, he know what he would do… implying it would be best for the child to remain in England. My grandmother’s mother couldn’t keep her niece as she already had three children and was expecting her fourth. However, a family friend who had five sons said that she would be delighted to take Betty as a ‘ready made daughter’.

I was quite shocked that Betty didn’t go back to her father in America who had now lost his wife and daughter in one foul swoop. But America would have seemed very far away and I understood that the father had suffered from shell-shock and was in and out of hospital. The marriage was also perhaps not that strong. I wonder if Norah ever planned to return herself…

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