Archives for posts with tag: exhibition

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I was planning to see Turner for this month’s exhibition this month but when I came to book tickets for Saturday it was fully booked so it will have to wait. Instead, my daughter and I went to see a printing exhibition called Outlines at the Oxford Castle. It explores the shapes and patterns created by the British countryside and what is particularly exciting is that much of it is local to us such as The White Horse, Boar’s Hill and Wittenham Clumps. The three artists work predominately with lino prints and Susan Wheeler is a favourite of mine. I was very pleased to see some of her newer works and I also feel delighted as I received some of her prints as a gift last year – they are still waiting to be framed but I feel inspired to get on with it.

This exhibition has now come to an end however the Oxford Printmakers have their Christmas sale next week and it is well worth visiting as the artists (including Susan Wheeler) donate one of their prints and they are then sold at rock bottom prices but arrive early!

About this post: My 2014 resolution is to visit a creative place every month.
January – The Ashmolean: Malcolm Morley
February – Oxford School of Photography
March – The Ashmolean: Cézanne and the modern

April – The Jam Factory
May – Art in Ardington
June – On Form exhibition
July – Crossing Borders
August – David in Florence
September – The Vale & Downland museum
October – The Art of the Brick

crossing1 crossing2 crossing4crossing3With hectic work and family commitments, I thought I would not be able to make it to an exhibition this month but an exhibition came to me. While waiting at Arlanda airport in Stockholm, I was able to enjoy an exhibition at the airport. What a cool place to display art and so much more satisfactory than browsing through a bookshop or tourist tat while waiting to return home.

An airport is a place where people who travel across borders meet and pass through. This exhibition depicts portraits of Swedes who work or have become famous outside their own country and included diplomats, musicians and athletes. Their work took them away from Sweden over geographic borders but they also broke barriers and borders in their spheres. The exhibition has crossed borders by being at an airport which challenges our perspectives of where we expect to find art and the ‘boundaries’ we place on an airport’s function.

I love viewing photography where the image reveals more about a person and is not trying to capture the ‘perfect smile’ or a glamorous pose. This challenges my response when I see photos of myself that I feel are not flattering. I also found it stimulating to see the reflections of the airport, of planes and travel paraphernalia on the glassy surfaces of the pictures creating new dimensions and breaking the borders between art and its surroundings.crossing5

About this post: My 2014 resolution is to visit a creative place every month.
January – The Ashmolean: Malcolm Morley
February – Oxford School of Photography
March – The Ashmolean: Cézanne and the modern

April – The Jam Factory
May – Art in Ardington
June – On Form Exhibiton

artinard2 artinard3 artinard4What I love about sculpture is the way in changes the surroundings and itself is changed depending on where it is placed. Ardington, a village in the shadow of The Ridgeway in Oxfordshire, has been transformed over the last two weeks with about 70 sculptures positioned near its streams, lakes, beautiful houses and Millennium woods. My friend and I met for a walk to enjoy time together, to catch up and also to appreciate the art. Some were good and some indifferent, but it was always exciting to spot the next one on our treasure hunt of sculpture as we shared our news. My favourite was the tall tall woman with a rusty, crusty texture by Pam Foley. It reminded me of Giacometti’s thin figures or the way our shadows become elongated and heads pin-shaped in the setting sun. The glass lozenges by Jenny Pickford made me smile as the colour glowed with joy. Some sculptures were not to my taste but still created beautiful shapes, textures or reflections that they gave us pleasure. What a pleasant way to start the week – talking with a dear friend and enjoying the familiar countryside subtly changed with the addition of sculptures.

Sadly Art in Ardington ended yesterday, so we were just ahead of the removal men who were taking the sculptures away, but if you are quick, you may still catch a few!artinard1 artinard5 artinard6About this post: My 2014 resolution is to visit a creative place every month.
January – The Ashmolean: Malcolm Morley
February – Oxford School of Photography
March – The Ashmolean: Cézanne and the modern

April – The Jam Factory

 

jam factory2 jam factory3I could say that the fourth excursion was back to the Cézanne exhibition as I returned to enjoy his art with my three children where they became quite animated in their discussions. But that felt like cheating so this month I visited The Jam Factory in Oxford to take pot luck in what was being exhibited. There are so many layers of pleasure here from interesting art to quirky décor to the story behind the building as this was where Frank Cooper’s Oxford Marmalade was made until production moved away in 1967. It is now a café, a meeting place and an art venue. As I wandered around, a group of mums with young babies gathered for coffee looking very NCTish which sent me down my own nostalgic path. But on with the art…

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Wait ’til it settles by Sarah Craddock

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Wait ’til it settles by Sarah Craddock

There were three exhibitions being held and my favourite was ‘Inspired by the Canal’. It is an exhibition of children’s art, professional artists and art from the community using Oxford’s canal as their inspiration. Starting in Banbury, the canal to Oxford wanders through Wolvercote ending quietly at busy Hythe Bridge Street in Oxford and is a secret byway waiting to be explored. I enjoyed the children’s boats, the hilarious tea cosies, the excellent etchings and found the contemporary installation thought-provoking.

Sarah Craddock had bottled and ‘packaged’ canal water from different spots that had witnessed stories – a birth, a drowning, an attack, a draining. The labels on the water provide a tantalising hint to the history and stories that the canal could tell. If the containers were not in an art gallery they would look like rubbish but their situation makes you think deeper and harder about water and the canal. As the water in the containers settles the good rises to the top and yet the history and sediment is also there to be acknowledged. Allowing situations to settle helps you to see things clearer and to extract the good from a situation. Even our English language alludes to what water teaches, “Don’t muddy the waters”.

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Tea cosies inspired by canal boats

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Etchings by Caroline Maas

The Canal Exhibition is only on until the 27 April 2014 but there is always something interesting to see and do at The Jam Factory – ‘Anyone for scrabble?’jam factory4jam factory1

About this post: My 2014 resolution is to visit a creative place every month.
January – The Ashmolean: Malcolm Morley
February – Oxford School of Photography
March – The Ashmolean: Cézanne and the modern

 

cezanne2cezanne“Painting from nature is not a matter of copying the subject but of expressing one’s feelings.” Cezanne

After a mad morning I finally made it to the Cézanne exhibition and as I walked in, I breathed a sigh as calmness descended. I love Cézanne’s work – the way he worked fast creating an impressing of a landscape without becoming bogged down in the detail. I feel as if he was enjoying the process of creating and not aiming at an end product.

There were a number of his sketches which are rough and use a mixture of watercolour and graphite. There are vertical pencil lines to suggest the trees while the leaves are in soft watercolours of blues, greens and purple which are calming and delight the eye. They are certainly not overworked and in their unfinished state the white spaces are just as important as the filled areas. It is as if he captured the gist of a view and then moved on. My favourite oil painting was Mont Sainte-Victoire (1904-06) and it was amazing to finally see it because in my final school year we had to study a post-impressionist in detail and then create a work in the style of the artist. I chose Cézanne and then in the spirit of the post-impressionists, I set myself with an easel and oils in the Kirstenbosch Botanical Gardens (Cape Town) and painted the view of the mountain. One of the things that struck me was how quickly and easy it was to paint with flat brushstrokes and yet challenging to fill the area without it becoming too two-dimensional.

In the painting Mont Sainte-Victoire I could see how loose his style was with the gleaming paint suggesting flickering light through the clouds. As Cézanne’s work became less descriptive it become more abstract and he began to simplify his shapes into basic squares, rectangles and cubes hence he is often known as the father of Cubism. I wanted to buy the postcard of the painting but it looked so dull after seeing the real thing that I didn’t bother – I think I will just visit again with my children in tow.

The exhibition is at the Ashmolean in Oxford until the 22 June 2014 and is well worth visiting.

About this post: My 2014 resolution is to visit a creative place every month.
January – The Ashmolean: Malcolm Morley
February – Oxford School of Photography

Glowing, luminous and jewel-like describe Lin Kerr’s orchid watercolours and I was delighted to attend the private viewing of her art at Dolphin Art Gallery. Lin is a lettering artist with a creative and diverse portfolio and her latest project has been exploring orchids in watercolour. She recently went on holiday to Singapore and, as artists do packed her paints, paper and brushes with a little space for a sarong or two. She knew she wanted to paint but it wasn’t until she arrived at the airport that the subject matter became obvious – orchids. There were masses of orchids everywhere from the airport shops to the local botanical gardens.

Orchids offer their own challenges as you paint because you can become distracted by the complexity of stems and leaves. Lin’s approach was to focus on the bloom and to float it in white space so that the flower becomes slightly abstract and we can appreciate its gorgeous colours and shapes. Lin also introduced a cartouche which acts as a design element and adds another layer of interest in the painting. A cartouche originates from Egyptian hieroglyphs where it was an oval with a horizontal line at one end which enclosed symbols and was used as a royal signature. Lin’s cartouches incorporate the name of the orchid.

Make sure a watercolour art-piece is on your Christmas wish list! Prices start at £95 for an unframed giclée (a giclée is a high quality reproduction on textured art paper).

Lin is exhibiting with Penny Gould who is a botanical artist and if you are near Wantage in Oxfordshire, visit Dolphin Art Gallery to see these talented women. The exhibition is from 15 – 24 September 2012 and they are also demonstrating their skills. Penny is demonstrating on Wednesday 19 September from 12.00 to 2.00pm and Lin is demonstrating on Monday 17 and 24 September from 12.00 to 2.00pm.

Visit Lin’s blog at limetreesstudio.blogspot.co.uk
View more of Penny Gould’s work on this link

Penny Gould (Botanical Artist) and Lin Kerr (Watercolourist)

Opening of ‘Flowers’ Exhibition at Dolphin Art Gallery